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MAY 13 & 14TH 10 AM - 12 PM EST

HIP-HOP

2

PREVENT

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#Faces4Change    #HipHopDev

A FIRST OF ITS KIND VIRTUAL CONFERENCE

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WHEN 

MAY 13TH & 14TH

10 AM-12 PM EST

ABOUT THE CONFERENCE 

The conference introduces an evidence-based, new school agenda focusing on health education for youth. Come to share and learn about how the use of Hip-Hop culture can be used to successfully motivate youth to choose healthy and drug-free lifestyles. 

HH2P PROMO VIDEO

Come to this conference that you'll not just learn from,

but will learn to use what you've learned.

 
 
 

CONFERENCE AGENDA

DAY ONE MAY 13, 2021

10:00 AM - 10:15 AM : CONFERENCE OPENING 

DAY ONE MAY 13, 2021

  • Welcome – Mayor Deanna Reed, Harrisonburg, VA

                        Jennifer Wilson, F4C Coalition Chair & Business Associate

  • Our Community Coalition – Dominique Dean, F4C Program Coordinator           

  • What’s Happening? – Pastor Costella Forney, F4C Community Connector,   John Wesley Methodist Church

  • The Charge –  Rev. Richard Henderson, Project Director, DFC Baltimore

  • Why Hip-Hop 2 Prevent? – P. Thandi Hicks Harper, PhD,                           F4C Project Director/ YPCI President & Chrissy Donald,                            James Madison University Student & YPCI Intern

FACES 4 CHANGE VIDEO FEATURE

10:15 AM - 10:37 AM : PANEL ONE 

Hip-Hop:  The 411 (Evolution, Trends

& Digital Communications 4 Health)

This session will increase the Hip-Hop cultural competence of all in attendance. The question “What is Hip-Hop?” will be discussed, along with the popular culture’s beginnings that are relevant to today’s realities. The trends and digital communications most vastly used by youth will be addressed along with why we are having this conversation for youth substance use prevention.

Featured Panelists

  • Timothy D. Jones, Founder, Techniques4Learning/#HipHopEd,     Silver Spring, MD

  • Martha Diaz, HipHop Education Center @Universal Hip-Hop Museum/HipHopCommuniversity (HHCU)/#hiphopeducation,        New York, NY

  • John Robinson, Co-author of Youth Culture Power, founding member of CodeSCTY, Hip Hop Artists and Visionary for over 2 decades.

10:37-10:48 AM YOUTH KEYNOTE ADDRESS

10:48-10:50 AM  MUSICAL INTERLUDE

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Jaela Morris “Young Elder”

Coppin State University, Baltimore, MD

“If Hip-Hop is Used 2 Market Products,

Then Surely We Can Use Hip-Hop 2 Market Prevention.”
 

10:50-11:10 AM: PANEL TWO

    Substance Use in Harrisonburg/Rockingham County

– The Data, Dangers, Risks & Roots

This session will present local data specific to the use of illicit drug use by youth (e.g., marijuana, methamphetamines, alcohol and prescription/over the counter drugs). The dangers, risks and roots will be addressed.

Featured Panelists

  • Brandy  Haden, Behavioral Health Wellness & Learning Coordinator, Harrisonburg/Rockingham County Community Services Board, Harrisonburg, VA

  • Debi Kipps-Vaughn, Psy.D., Licensed Clinical Psychologist/Professor, JMU, Harrisonburg, VA

11:10-11:30 AM: PANEL THREE

Young Voices – Shout Out

In this session, we will hear from young people. Their voices pertaining to substance use, Hip-Hop and how to best reach young people will be explored.

Featured Panelists

  • Jaela Morris “Young Elder,” Coppin State University, Baltimore, MD

  • Endre Szakal, President, Kinetix Breakdance Crew, JMU, Harrisonburg, VA

  • Akiel Baker, Eastern Mennonite University (EMU), Harrisonburg, VA

11:30-11:35 AM: JAMES MADISON UNIVERSITY REP’S HIP-HOP

JMU KINETIX BREAKDANCERS

11:35-11:45 AM: THOUGHTS IN A REMIX ONE

  • Forward Thinking - Destiny Brown, Leilani's Lens Baltimore, MD

11:45-12:00 PM: DAY ONE RECAP, DAY 2 OVERVIEW, EVALUATION

DAY TWO MAY 14, 2021

10:00 AM - 10:05 AM : CONFERENCE OPENING, WELCOME BACK, DAY 1 RECAP 

DAY TWO MAY 14, 2021

HIP-HOP: WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW 4 EFFECTIVE PREVENTION 4 YOUTH VIDEO FEATURE

10:05-10:25 AM PANEL ONE

The Role of Hip-Hop in Promoting Health Education

This session will highlight agencies using Hip-Hop as a tool to prevent substance use among youth. Their use of Hip-Hop's core components within evidence-based strategies, along with adaptations to ensure relatability, to their youth will be discussed.


Featured Panelists

  • Caren Kirkand, Director of Consumer Care, Dept of Behavioral Health & Community Support Agencies, District of Columbia

  • Jennifer Van Ross & Alanis Olivarez, Substance Abuse Counselors, Bee Busy Inc., Houston, TX

  • Mike Graham Squire, Community Health Manager,      Neighborhood House, Seattle, WA

10:25-10:45 PANEL TWO

Connecting Law Enforcement – Preventing Marijuana, Methamphetamines and Over The
Counter/Prescription Drug Misuse Among Youth

This session will reveal youth related stories that law enforcement and the juvenile courts have encountered, including new marijuana law potential risks. Solutions to assist in alleviating the challenges and available resources will be provided. Proper disposal of prescription drugs and the drug-take back national program will be discussed.

 

Featured Panelists

  • Judge Anthony W. Bailey, Harrisonburg/Rockingham County Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court Judge, District Court 26th Judicial District of Virginia

  • Lieutenant Chris Monahan, Harrisonburg Police Department, Harrisonburg, VA

  • Ben Stevenson, Prevention & Harm Reduction Manager, Montgomery County, MD

10:45-10:47 AM MUSICAL INTERLUDE


10:47-11:02 ADULT KEYNOTE ADDRESS

“Hip-Hop 4 Positive Social

and Emotional Youth Engagement”
 

Ian Levy, EdD, School Counselor

& Assistant Professor, Manhattan College, NY

11:02-11:22 PANEL THREE

Community Voices

 

This session will highlight Harrisonburg/Rockingham County community voices. The focus will be on lessons learned and AHA moments when working to successful engage youth. Challenges and successes will also be discussed – many of which are relative to communities nationwide.

Featured Panelists

  • Emani Morse, Director of Middle School Programs & Data, On the Road Collaborative & F4C Sector Member, Harrisonburg, VA

  • Onesimo Baltazar Corona, Project Coordinator, Futuro Latino DFC & F4C Collaborator, Harrisonburg, VA

  • Stephanie Howard, Supervisor, Lucy F. Simms Continuing Education Center/Parks & Rec & F4C Community Collaborator, Harrisonburg, VA

  • Dr. Chris Johnson, Lead Pastor, Divine Unity Community Church, Harrisonburg, VA

11:22-11:25 HIP-HOP SPOKEN WORD
"Light"

Brianna Madden-Olivares

Student, The New School, NY

& F4C Community Collaborator

11:25-11:45 PANEL FOUR

Bringing it Home:  Why is a F4C Drug-Free Communities Coalition Important?


This session will discuss the role of the DFC in communities to combat substance use. The various sectors will be introduced and ways that the collaboration of resources and coalition building can best facilitate the overall mission will be examined.

Featured Panelists

  • Sandra Quigg, Director, Boys & Girls Club of Harrisonburg/
    Rockingham County & F4C Sector Member, Harrisonburg, VA 

  • Dany Fleming, Parent/Community Activist & F4C Sector Member, Harrisonburg, VA

  • Frank Sottaceti, Criminal Justice Planner, Harrisonburg/        Rockingham County, VA

11:45-11:55 AM THOUGHTS IN A REMIX TWO

  •  Forward Thinking - Dominique Dean & Costella Forney,                       F4C Project Coordinator & Community Connector, Harrisonburg, VA

11:55 AM-NOON CLOSING REMARKS,

GIVING THANKS, EVALUATION

  • Staying Connected - P. Thandi Hicks Harper, Ph.D., F4C Project Director/   YPCI President & Chrissy Donald, JMU Student & YPCI-F4C Intern

 

KEYNOTE SPEAKER BIOS

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YOUNG ELDER

Young Elder is a 19-year-old recording artist and Healing Youth Alliance ambassador. She is also a member of The Trauma-Informed Care Taskforce, co-founder of her business Quarantine Delights, a Heartsmiles youth leader, and a current Freshman at Coppin State University. Young Elder was born and raised in Baltimore, and is passionate about advocating for better mental health for young people across Baltimore and nationwide. 

IAN LEVY, EdD

Dr. Ian Levy is an Assistant Professor of School Counseling at Manhattan College, New York City native, former High School counselor. His research explores preparing school counselors to use hip-hop based interventions to support youth development. Most notably, Dr. Levy piloted the development, implementation, and evaluation of a Hip-Hop based counseling framework, which has been featured in the New York Times, CNN, and published in a variety of reputable academic journals. Ian is also the author of the research monograph, Hip-Hop and Spoken Word Therapy in School Counseling: Developing Culturally Responsive Approaches, published with Routledge.

FEATURED ARTISTS

JMU's Kinetix Breakdance Crew's purpose is to bring together those who appreciate and want to learn breakdancing as a form of expression and keep this culture alive throughout JMU. The Kinetix Breakdance crew are open to all levels of experience, as long as members have a passion for breakdance and Hip-Hop culture. The crew also makes sure to provide a very supportive social community in order to provide a safe space when learning and practicing breakdancing. The Kinetix motto is: "Define your Motion."

JMU KINETIX BREAKDANCE CREW

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BRIANNA MADDEN-OLIVARES

Bri is from Spanish Harlem and has loved poetry since the third grade.  She currently lives in Shenandoah, VA and was a Spotswood High School graduate.

Bri is now a drama student at The New School in New York, and in her free time she enjoys naps, reading, and hanging out with friends.

 
 
 
 

ABOUT FACES 4 CHANGE

540-820-0763
Faces4changeharrisonburg@gmail.com

FACES 4 CHANGE HARRISONBURG - A DRUG-FREE COMMUNITIES COALITION

 

The Youth Popular Culture Institute, Inc. (YPCI) was awarded a US Department of Health and Human Services,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Drug-Free Communities (DFC) Coalition grant for Harrisonburg, VA. YPCI is a 501c3 organization with a long-standing history of working in Harrisonburg communities, and Faces 4 Change (F4C) is the name given to the coalition in 2009. The F4C goal is to mobilize and continue the energy and
engagement to secure resources for collaborations that will contribute to reducing and preventing youth substance use. P. Thandi Hicks Harper, PhD will be spearheading this effort, with Coalition Sector Members and Community Collaborators, to be of service to children, youth and families in Harrisonburg and Rockingham County.

 

The DFC Support Program was created by the Drug-Free Communities Act of 1997 (Public Law 105-20). The Executive Office of the President, Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) accepted applications for DFC Support Program grants.
 

The purpose of the DFC Support Program is to establish and strengthen collaboration to support the efforts of community coalitions working to prevent youth substance use.

 

By statute, the DFC Support Program has two goals:


1) Establish and strengthen collaboration among communities, public and private non-profit agencies, as well as federal, state, local, and tribal governments to support the efforts of community coalitions working to prevent and reduce substance abuse among youth (individuals 18 years of age and younger).


2) Reduce substance abuse among youth and, over time, reduce substance abuse among adults by addressing the factors in a community that increase the risk of substance abuse and promoting the factors that minimize the risk of substance abuse.

 

A coalition is defined as a community-based formal arrangement for cooperation and collaboration among groups or sectors of a community in which each group retains its identity, but all agree to work together toward a common goal of building a safe, healthy, and drug-free community.


F4C 12 COMMUNITY SECTORS:

• Youth (18 or younger)
• Parent
• Business
• Media
• School
• Youth-serving organization
• Law enforcement

• Religious/Fraternal organization
• Civic/Volunteer group
• Healthcare professional
• State, local, or tribal governmental agency substance abuse expertise
• Other organization involved in reducing substance abuse

 

WHAT IS THE YOUTH POPULAR CULTURE INSTITUTE (YPCI)?


 

 

YPCI is a 501c3 non-profit research, communications and production company comprised of certified educators, researchers, technologists, public health and youth development experts, parents, producers, activists and students who are committed to the intellectual, emotional, spiritual and social welfare of youth, families and communities that are most marginalized.
 

Established in 1985 as Thandi’s Place Productions and incorporated as YPCI in 1999, we conduct and collect research worldwide on topics related to youth popular culture (particularly Hip-Hop), health and education. YPCI conducts professional development trainings on social emotional learning (SEL) strategies, positive youth engagement and development, health prevention and youth culture; and continues to transform its research
into applied technologies, special events, programs and marketable user-friendly products for audiences that work to successfully engage young people. Hip-Hop 2 Prevent Substance Abuse and HIV/AIDS (H2P) is the company’s signature Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services (SAMSHA) online/offline evidence-based curriculum - currently being implemented throughout the country (www.hiphop2prevent.com ).

 

Founded by P. Thandi Hicks Harper, PhD, YPCI focuses on providing the research, resources, technical assistance and products required to improve the health and education status of America’s most disadvantaged youth, and to inform the nation of the gifts youth bring with them to engagement spaces. YPCI also works to increase the youth popular culture competence of stakeholders, including innovative ways to incorporate this awareness and knowledge for motivating young people to be intrinsically driven to succeed academically and to make smart behavioral choices.


OUR VISION AND MISSION

A better understanding of youth popular culture and its power to advance the education and health outcomes of young people that are most marginalized.

 

Doing a better job with youth popular culture in education and health by transforming basic research and evidence-based practices (adaptive, cultural, scientific and intuitive) into applied technologies, policies, special events, programs, curriculums, and marketable products that WORK for children, youth, families, communities, professionals and other stakeholders who interact with and in the best interests of young people.


www.hiphop2prevent.com, www.ypci.org, starr@ypci.org

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MEET THE F4C COALITION

COALITION ADMINISTRATORS 

Jennifer Wilson – Coalition Chair/Business Official

                     P. Thandi Hicks Harper, Ph.D. – Project Director/                  Principal Investigator, Youth Popular Culture Institute, Inc. (YPCI) President

Dominique Dean – Project Coordinator

Pastor Costella Forney – Community Connector

Chrissy Donald – YPCI/F4C James Madison University Intern

SECTOR MEMBERS/SECTOR

Gabriel Camacho, Law Enforcement Representative

Katrina Didot, Business Representative

Chrissy Donald, School Representative

Dany Fleming, Parent Representative

Costella P. Forney, Religious/Fraternal Organization Representative

Brandy Haden, State/Local/Tribal Government Representative

Thandika Starr Harper-Hicks, Healthcare Professional

Luisa Mendez, Youth Representative

Emani Morse, Other Organization Involved in Reducing

Substance Abuse Representative

Elizabeth Nathanson, Civic/Volunteer Organization Representative

Sandra Quigg, Youth Serving Organization Representative 

Larry M. Rogers, Healthcare Professional

John Salem, Media Representative

Malcom Thomas, School Representative

COMMUNITY COLLABORATORS

Onesimo Baltazar Corona 

Elaine Blakey

Janet Harvey 

Stephanie Howard 

Brianna Madden-Olivares

Regan McManus 

Chris Parks

Mackenzie Saturn

Allie Sawyer

Mary Walala

We invite all Harrisonburg & Rockingham County workers and residents to become Faces 4 Change Drug-Free Community Coalition Sector Members and/or Collaborators. Your input is important as we work together to combat substance use among youth in our communities. Please contact us at faces4changeharrisonburg@gmail.com for more information. 

 


CONFERENCE MODERATORS/ANNOUNCERS

Chrissy Donald

James Madison University (JMU) Student &

Youth Popular Culture Institute, Inc (YPCI) - F4C Intern

Destiny Brown
Leilani's Lens


P. Thandi Hicks Harper, PhD
F4C Project Director/YPCI President

HIP-HOP 2 PREVENT

VIRTUAL CONFERENCE TEAM 


Executive Producer - P. Thandi Hicks Harper, F4C Project Director/Principal

 

Investigator, YPCI President 

 


 Associate Producer - Chrissy Donald, JMU Student/YPCI-F4C Intern

 


 Senior Producer/Zoom Coordinator - Destiny Brown, Leilani's Lens

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